Main Article Content

Abstract

Military postings, though unplanned, are routinely carried out with serious implications on the dependants of posted officers. Using the in-depth interviews, focus group discussions and key informant interviews, data were extracted from officers, non-commissioned officers, wives and children of deployed officers in the Nigeria Army. Findings indicate that military officers preferred international peace keeping missions to national postings owing to the opportunity of better treatment including earning dollars to build houses. Participants also reported language and culture gains. However, strains of loneliness, home neglect by deployed officers, infidelity, unmet emotional needs, and truncated educational pursuit of children as well as indulgence in crime and deviant behaviour by children of the deployed officers were reported problems associated with posting. Recommendations were made to reduce strains in deployed military personnel’s’ families.

Keywords

Insecurity Military deployment Family Strains Women

Article Details

How to Cite
Olapegba, P. O., Tade, O., & Davies, O. B. (2020). Military Deployment and Family Strains in Nigeria. IBADAN JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY, 11(1), 23. Retrieved from https://ibadanjournalofsociology.org/IJS/article/view/135